Episode 179

full
Published on:

6th Mar 2023

Level Up Your Station's Online Game Plan: Seth Resler Shares Tips You Gotta Know

Seth Resler is the Digital Dot Connector at Jacobs Media Strategies. He really gets it when it comes to radio and digital media, and the perfect guy to help any radio brand step up their online game. He's a frequent speaker at conferences like the Worldwide Radio Summit, Podcast Movement, and state broadcast association meetings.

Also, he's got a knack for writing and has contributed to publications such as AllAccess.com, Radio World, and his many great blog posts.

Listen carefully to hear his 5 online tips, and some other great insights. (There's no prize if you identify them all, but IF YOU EXECUTE THEM, you're likely to see growth in your audience and revenues!)

Key Takeaways you won't want to miss!

(1:54) Seth has shared how media and audience patterns have seen significant changes or takeaways since the pandemic.

(4:44) Seth explains how stations, podcasts, and event personality brands can easily conduct a usability test for their brand's websites, and outlines some "no-brainer" steps that many radio station websites are missing.

(7:39) If a new client station had no online presence, including no website, streaming, podcasts, or social media, Seth would recommend some first steps to catch up, assuming they were interested.

 (11:13) For individuals wanting to take control of their own online presence amidst the constant reality of another round of cuts Seth shared some key shortcuts.

(13:25) With everyone needing more revenue, Seth notes that stations can now conduct webinars exclusively for their advertisers to gain traction with them and explains how it works.

ONE MINUTE MARTIZING "Write"

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Transcript
Seth:

So I think everybody, no matter how well you're doing as an on-air

Seth:

personality, needs to line some things up and have some things ready just in

Seth:

case the worst case scenario happens.

Seth:

So first and foremost, get a website.

VO:

Welcome to BRANDwidth On Demand, your Guide to Rebooting Radio.

Seth:

What a lot of radio station websites are doing is they have

Seth:

that slideshow on the homepage.

Seth:

We hate that slideshow.

Seth:

If there's one thing I would like, Bann from the radio industry.

Seth:

It is the slideshow on the home.

Seth:

First of all, nobody's sticking around long enough to see multiple slots.

Seth:

It's terrible from the listener's point of view.

Seth:

So my first suggestion is pull out that slideshow and treat that

Seth:

space like a billboard by the

VO:

highway.

VO:

Bandwidth on demand, rebooting radio with a different take on all radio can.

VO:

Now your guides through the media Morphosis, David Martin and author

VO:

of the book, BRANDwidth, Media Branding, coach Kipper McGee.

Dave:

Our guest this time is a 25 year broadcast vet who's worked on air and

Dave:

behind the scenes in programming and markets, ranging from Providence, St.

Dave:

Louis, Seattle, Boston, New York City.

Dave:

He's.

Dave:

He's also done radio in Silicon Valley before crossing into online marketing.

Dave:

Now, Seth Wrestler is known as the digital dot connector for Jacobs Media.

Dave:

Seth works with broadcasters across the US helping them design and implement

Dave:

action plans to combine all their online assets and their radio burns.

Dave:

And that includes websites, social media, email marketing, content marketing,

Dave:

seo, lead generation, and other online tools, so necessary to success.

Dave:

And even more vital tomorrow is.

Dave:

Rambling on demand is proud to welcome back the guy who sees where

Dave:

the radios industry is going, and actually helps us get there too.

Dave:

Seth Resler.

Kipper:

Hey, Seth.

Seth:

Hey.

Seth:

Hey, hey.

Seth:

Thank you.

Seth:

Thank you for having me on it.

Seth:

It's an honor.

Kipper:

Thanks for doing this.

Kipper:

One thing is you follow media and audience patterns on so many levels.

Kipper:

You're tracking things all six ways from Sunday.

Kipper:

What are some of the biggest changes or takeaways you've

Kipper:

seen since we last connected?

Seth:

Boy.

Seth:

Big changes or takeaways?

Seth:

I'll tell you something that I'm excited about, I think is

Seth:

going to impact media eventually.

Seth:

I don't think that it has yet.

Seth:

You know that if you look at the internet over the last 30 something

Seth:

years, I think one of the real big stories has been the increased

Seth:

availability for the general everyday person to have these publishing tools.

Seth:

Once upon a time, if you wanted to reach a mass, You needed to have a radio tower.

Seth:

You needed to have a television studio.

Seth:

You needed to have a printing press, things that were big and expensive, and

Seth:

also took a lot of specialization in terms of knowledge to know how to use.

Seth:

And now anybody on the street with smartphone and an internet connection

Seth:

can really publish something that can go around the world.

Seth:

And so I think that's been a big trend and it's meant that there's just a lot

Seth:

more competition for eyeballs and earballs and all that kind of stuff, but also

Seth:

that there's been some upside to it.

Seth:

It's given voice to a lot of people who maybe didn't have voice before,

Seth:

but also there's just a lot of flow quality content out there.

Seth:

So that's been something that we've been watching happening,

Seth:

I think during the pandemic.

Seth:

One of the things that we've seen is the rise and popularization of

Seth:

almost a new class of digital tools.

Seth:

Whereas what we were seeing before was these publishing tools.

Seth:

Now we're starting to see, I guess what you would call community tools.

Seth:

Things that allow people to, uh, really build communities and create communities.

Seth:

And some of this was there before the pandemic, but became widely used.

Seth:

And so the idea is before what we've been doing is creating content.

Seth:

And hoping that we would attract an audience.

Seth:

Hopefully people would like our content and come to us and

Seth:

you can talk to the audience.

Seth:

They can maybe talk back to you a little bit.

Seth:

Maybe they can send you an email or something, but not really, not at

Seth:

scale or in any meaningful way, and the audience members can't talk to each other.

Seth:

Now we've got a new set of tools, things like Zoom, things like Facebook groups,

Seth:

things like Slack channels, things like these, uh, communities that you can

Seth:

build with Mighty Networks or all that kind of stuff, virtual event software.

Seth:

And so now what you're doing is not creating content.

Seth:

You're creating a space and you're letting people gather in those spaces.

Seth:

And when they gather in those spaces, not only can you talk to

Seth:

them and they can talk to you, but now they can talk to each.

Seth:

And that really becomes about building community.

Seth:

And I think community is fundamentally different from an audience.

Seth:

And so I think you're going to start to see over the next 10 years, media

Seth:

companies really embrace that notion of how do we build a community?

Seth:

How do we create a place where our audience members can talk to each other

Seth:

and really take advantage of that?

Dave:

Seth, recently you had a great blog post about how stations, podcasts,

Dave:

even personality, Can conduct a usability test for their brand's website.

Dave:

We link to the blog posts on our show notes.

Dave:

What are some of the no-brainers tests set that websites are missing, and what's

Dave:

the one thing that you recommend that may not be in your post as a matter?

Seth:

Yeah, so let's talk a little bit about what a website usability test is,

Seth:

because it's a little different than the research that radio is used to doing.

Seth:

Yeah.

Seth:

We're all used to perceptual research or call out research or things like that.

Seth:

This.

Seth:

Basically trying to answer the question, how do people use our website?

Seth:

And really what is that experience like?

Seth:

Is it a positive experience?

Seth:

Is it easy for them?

Seth:

Do they get frustrated?

Seth:

And if there are points at which they get frustrated when using our websites,

Seth:

and by the way, you can also, uh, use usability tests on mobile apps, so

Seth:

it's a little trickier, but when they do have that user experience with the

Seth:

website, what are the pain points and how can we fix them and figure them?

Seth:

And it's a little bit of a different test.

Seth:

It's, this is not a down to the decimal point scientific test.

Seth:

This is gonna smack yourself in the head and, oh boy, why didn't

Seth:

we think of that kind of test?

Seth:

You're just looking for the sort of the top line, oh, this is giving

Seth:

people a problem, let's change it.

Seth:

Yes.

Seth:

And so what we do, and by the way, the process that I'm outlining

Seth:

here, I completely stole, right?

Seth:

I took it from a guy named Steve Krug, K r.

Seth:

Oh sure.

Seth:

Great book.

Seth:

Yeah, he's written a pair of books that are great.

Seth:

The first one's called, Don't Make Me Think, which is about website design.

Seth:

And the second one is called Rocket Surgery Made Easy in which

Seth:

he outlines the usability testing process that he goes through.

Seth:

And that's how I taught myself how to run usability tests.

Seth:

I've read his book and it's the kind of book I like.

Seth:

It's big font, lots of pictures.

Seth:

Yep.

Seth:

It's only about a hundred pages.

Seth:

You can read it in two hours, but it's fantastic.

Seth:

So what you do is you go get three, you get 'em off the internet.

Seth:

I usually use Craigslist.

Seth:

We pay 'em 50 bucks a pop.

Seth:

We bring 'em in one at a time.

Seth:

I prefer to use people who are outside of the market, and the reason I prefer to use

Seth:

people outside of the market is because I want them reacting to the website.

Seth:

I don't want them to bring any knowledge that they might have

Seth:

about the station from From baggage.

Seth:

Yeah.

Seth:

Yeah.

Seth:

From being a listen.

Seth:

So I prefer to use people.

Seth:

If people who are completely unfamiliar with the station can figure out the

Seth:

website, people who are actually listeners are gonna have no problem with it.

Seth:

And in my experience, a rock listener, it does not use websites differently

Seth:

than a hip hop listener or a top 40.

Seth:

Like it's all the same.

Seth:

I've only ever, I think, thrown out one test, cuz clearly the person was

Seth:

just, Crazy . Yeah, that happens.

Seth:

It does happen.

Seth:

And I honestly, I, we have started conducting these website tests,

Seth:

especially during the pandemic over Zoom, though I still do prefer to,

Seth:

it's just easier to do it in person.

Kipper:

Oh, absolutely.

Kipper:

And plus people don't want to travel or go out these days.

Seth:

Yeah, yeah.

Seth:

So you can do it over Zoom, but there's always, there's always

Seth:

some little extra complications.

Seth:

Mm-hmm.

Seth:

. But what you do is one at a time, you sit 'em down.

Seth:

Yeah.

Seth:

And.

Seth:

You pull up the radio stations website and the first question you ask is,

Seth:

what does this organization do?

Seth:

and what you're hoping they're gonna say is, oh, it's a radio station, it's

Seth:

88.1, and they play rock music and blah.

Seth:

But often they don't know.

Seth:

And I've actually had a radio station where the tester was looking

Seth:

at the site for 10 minutes before they figured out it was a radio

Seth:

station that they were looking at.

Seth:

And part of that depends on the name, right?

Seth:

If you're 88.1 W K R P F M?

Seth:

Yeah.

Seth:

Okay.

Seth:

It's a radio station if you're the Hawk.

Seth:

No, the mountain.

Seth:

I don't know what that is.

Seth:

Maybe it's coffee.

Seth:

I.

Seth:

Then the next thing we'll ask is where is this radio station?

Seth:

And you'd be amazed how many radio station websites do not say the

Seth:

name of the city that they're in because we all live in the same city.

Seth:

When we hear the radio station, we don't have to say it on the air over and over

Seth:

cause everybody's in the same place.

Seth:

But on the internet, that's not true.

Seth:

So you need to tell people where they are and then we'll say, okay,

Seth:

if you tuned into this radio station, what would you expect to hear on it?

Seth:

Hopefully they can figure out the genre of music.

Seth:

Sometimes they can, sometimes they can't.

Seth:

And then we'll ask what type of artists or names of artists you might hear.

Seth:

And that's where it can get tricky because what a lot of

Seth:

radio station websites are doing.

Seth:

Is they have that slideshow on the homepage.

Seth:

You hate that slideshow.

Seth:

Mm-hmm.

Seth:

, if there's one thing I would like to just ban from the radio industry, it

Seth:

is the slideshow on the home page.

Seth:

, you're here fir, first of all, nobody's sticking around long

Seth:

enough to see multiple slides.

Seth:

Yeah, that right.

Seth:

And really what the slideshow does is it settles fights in the building because

Seth:

you've got the salesperson who wants the car dealership in there, and you've got

Seth:

the promo director who wants the street team of parents and Dunkin Donuts in.

Seth:

And you've got the music director who wants whatever sea level band

Seth:

is playing the right 200 seat club this weekend up there and see you

Seth:

just, you're like Oprah Winfrey.

Seth:

You go, oh, you get a slide and you get a slide . You get a slide.

Seth:

You get a slide and everybody's happy.

Seth:

Cause everybody's on the homepage now.

Seth:

But it's a, it is terrible from the listener's point of view.

Seth:

So my first suggestion is pull out that.

Seth:

Slideshow and treat that space like a billboard by the highway.

Seth:

What would you put on the billboard to instantly convey in a single

Seth:

image what your station is all about, which is probably your core artist.

Seth:

So if that's Elton John and Pink, put them up there and you know what?

Seth:

Whatever it is.

Seth:

So that's one of the things that we off.

Seth:

The next question we'll start to ask as we go through the website is we will

Seth:

ask them to look at the main menu of the website and we'll say, don't click.

Seth:

Anything in the menu, but go through the menu one at a time

Seth:

and tell me what you would expect to see if you did click on that.

Seth:

And they'll go, okay, home.

Seth:

That takes me to the homepage.

Seth:

Fine.

Seth:

And they'll say, listen, live.

Seth:

Okay.

Seth:

I know what that does.

Seth:

Listen, live contest.

Seth:

I know what that is.

Seth:

Concerts.

Seth:

Okay.

Seth:

Those all work great.

Seth:

And then they'll get to something that says On air.

Seth:

And on air could be anything, because everything you do is on air, your

Seth:

commercials are on air, your DJs are on air, your music is on air.

Seth:

So it's not really clear what most websites mean by that is DJs or shows.

Seth:

And that's much better verbiage.

Seth:

Some of the stakes that we see in that main menu is that we will

Seth:

often see verbiage That makes sense if you are familiar with the radio

Seth:

station, but not if you're not.

Seth:

So maybe if you call your email club, like the v i p list.

Seth:

Mm-hmm.

Seth:

say V I P list, and the main menu, which won't mean something to somebody who's

Seth:

not that familiar with the radio station.

Seth:

And so it's useful to either say V I P club, the v i P list, email

Seth:

club, or something like that.

Seth:

Take what it is.

Seth:

. Good point.

Kipper:

Shifting gears just a little bit, Seth, one thing that's really

Kipper:

happening, and you know this better than most of us, is the constant

Kipper:

reality of another round of budget cuts.

Kipper:

It's, it is just nuts.

Kipper:

And I know you've got a plan for how individuals can take

Kipper:

control of their online presence.

Kipper:

And if you wouldn't mind, why don't you recap up some of your key points?

Seth:

Yeah, so I think this is important if you are an on-air

Seth:

personality, and let's face it, these.

Seth:

On-air personalities can find themselves out of work for reasons that have nothing

Seth:

to do with their performance, right?

Seth:

It could just be a Wall Street maneuver, Hey, we need to spin off the station,

Seth:

see ya, and the whole thing gets sold.

Seth:

So I think everybody, no matter how well you're doing as an on-air

Seth:

personality, needs to line some things up and have some things ready just in

Seth:

case the worst case scenario happens.

Seth:

So first, and for.

Seth:

Get a website.

Seth:

They're pretty easy these days.

Seth:

Go and register your your name as a domain.

Seth:

I have seth wrestler.com.

Seth:

Go get whatever your name is or whatever the name of your show

Seth:

is, if you think that you would.

Seth:

Stay with your same show, should it not continue to be affiliated with the

Seth:

radio station and throw a website up.

Seth:

It's real easy these days with things like Wick and Squarespace

Seth:

tools that make it super easy.

Seth:

I like WordPress cuz it's free and easy, and WordPress developers are easy

Seth:

to find, but you don't have to spend a million dollars to have a website.

Seth:

these days.

Seth:

And what you need up there is a simple bio, a headshot use one that's more

Seth:

recent than mine, on my to-do list.

Seth:

And as soon as I lose the covid 20 pounds that I gained,

Seth:

I will get another headshot.

Seth:

But put that up there.

Seth:

Put your air check demo up on that website, your social

Seth:

media links, things like that.

Seth:

So get that all lined up and ready to go get your social media profiles

Seth:

in order, including LinkedIn.

Seth:

Don't forget about LinkedIn in as a place that you need to update

Seth:

and have something ready to go.

Seth:

But obviously Twitter and if you've got a Facebook page or you're on TikTok

Seth:

and all that, and YouTube as well.

Seth:

YouTube's a great place to put.

Seth:

Your air check demo on.

Seth:

Just have there a SoundCloud.

Seth:

You can throw an air check demo up there as well.

Seth:

It's actually not hard to find my air checks from over the years.

Seth:

If you know how to Google, you can hear me back in.

Seth:

, WBCM like 20 years ago and stuff like that.

Dave:

All right.

Dave:

. Seth, you said that radio stations contain traction with their advertisers

Dave:

by conducting webinars just for them.

Dave:

How does that work?

Seth:

Yeah, so I like this.

Seth:

I'm still a fan of webinars.

Seth:

They still work.

Seth:

They still work for us at Jacob's Media.

Seth:

Basically the idea is what you're trying to do is capture people's email address.

Seth:

You're.

Seth:

Build an email list that allows you to send stuff to people.

Seth:

In this case, we're talking about potential advertising

Seth:

clients for the station.

Seth:

And so start to make a list of the questions that your sales

Seth:

team hears over and over again.

Seth:

Maybe it's something like, so how did Nielsen ratings work anyway?

Seth:

Or, how do I write a great 62nd spot or whatever, uh, and then

Seth:

create a webinar around it, which means create a PowerPoint.

Seth:

These things don't have to be long.

Seth:

Don't feel like this has to be a 45 minute lecture.

Seth:

20 minutes is gonna be fine and just walk.

Seth:

Step by step and then it's easy these days with the webinar software.

Seth:

I mean for a long time we were using a go to webinar and there's WebEx

Seth:

out there, but Zoom has allows you to do webinars pretty easily too.

Seth:

And so host a webinar.

Seth:

I think the most important part is go find a partner on it.

Seth:

And a partner is an organization that is targeting the same people that

Seth:

you're targeting but is not your.

Seth:

So obviously Chamber of Commerce.

Seth:

Yeah.

Seth:

Chamber of Commerce is a great example, right?

Seth:

Or if there's a hospitality industry or this sort of trade group or that sort

Seth:

of trade group in your organization, or maybe there's a, a monthly business

Seth:

journal in your city team up with them.

Seth:

You know what you want in that partner.

Seth:

You want them to have an email list.

Seth:

Okay, cuz basically they're gonna bring all the people to your webinar

Seth:

and you'll then capture those emails.

Seth:

But then you're gonna provide the content and what they get out of it is

Seth:

that they're providing some valuable content to their email DA database.

Seth:

And so it's a win-win for both.

Seth:

Yeah, I think I love that strategy.

Dave:

The always amazing Seth Resler with us today.

Dave:

Somebody you'd love to hear from.

Dave:

We'd love to hear from you.

Dave:

Suggest a guest.

Dave:

Email us Show at Brand with on demand.com.

Kipper:

And if you like what you're hearing or finding value, please tell a

Kipper:

friend and be sure to give us a five star rating wherever you download this podcast.

Dave:

Coming up, Seth, share some opportunities that many may

Dave:

find hiding and playing sight.

VO:

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VO:

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Get in touch at Mmusicmaster.com slash sales.

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Kipper:

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Today,

VO:

Opportunities hidden in plain sight, plain Sight, BRANDwidth on Demand.

Dave:

We're with Seth Resler, the Wizard, really at Jacobs Media.

Dave:

Of all things digital and really non-traditional thinking, Seth,

Dave:

about the entire radio industry.

Dave:

What's one opportunity that you see that's hiding in plain sight?

Seth:

So I wanna come back to the thing that I was talking about when

Seth:

we first started our conversation, which is this community marketing idea

Seth:

or this community building concept.

Seth:

I think there's a real opportunity for radio stations to build

Seth:

community from within their audience.

Seth:

And I think what we're really talking about our communities, I think the

Seth:

audience as a whole is too big.

Seth:

To be a single community in most cases.

Seth:

I think you've gotta look for communities within that audience.

Seth:

And the reason why is for community to be a community.

Seth:

We talked about creating a space where people can gather, and those people,

Seth:

once they gather in that space, they have to want to talk to each other.

Seth:

So they have to share a common interest.

Seth:

But we often, when we're talking about radio programming, talk about,

Seth:

okay, we've got the A level thing that brings all the people to our radio

Seth:

station, which is usually the music.

Seth:

And then we've got the B level thing.

Seth:

So if you're running a rock station, maybe it's craft beer, or it's football,

Seth:

or it's Harley Davidson bikes or whatever it is, look at those things

Seth:

that you may already be talking about on the air to some degree and say, how

Seth:

can we build a community around that?

Seth:

I think there's four things that go into building a community.

Seth:

One, a live event of some sort, which you may already be doing.

Seth:

Let's say you're already doing a local music battle of the

Seth:

bands that you do every year.

Seth:

Great.

Seth:

There's your live.

Seth:

I think two is virtual events.

Seth:

And virtual events are not substitutes for live events.

Seth:

They supplement live events.

Seth:

So maybe we do a, maybe we do a webinar like we were talking about,

Seth:

and we have a record label rep in one.

Seth:

And this is just for local bands.

Seth:

And we have a, a promoter for another and we have a manager for another.

Seth:

And it's a series of webinars to engage.

Seth:

Those local musicians to help them develop their career.

Seth:

I think three, you create an online community and there's

Seth:

lots of tools to do that.

Seth:

Now, the two best are Facebook groups and LinkedIn groups, so build a community for

Seth:

local musicians there and let them gather and talk and connect with one another.

Seth:

And then four, create content.

Seth:

And you may already be doing this, especially let's say you're a rock

Seth:

station and you already have a one hour local music show that you do

Seth:

every Wednesday night at midnight.

Seth:

Great, you're done.

Seth:

So you know, really you could have half the work done for you.

Seth:

You could already have the live event and the content in place.

Seth:

And now it's just about great, let's do a series of virtual events and let's create

Seth:

an online community, something like a Facebook group where these people can.

Seth:

And when you do that, you are creating a space where that community can

Seth:

gather and they can talk to each other.

Seth:

And once you figure out how to do that once, then I think you

Seth:

can start to repeat the model.

Seth:

So let's say, great, we've done this successfully with local musicians.

Seth:

Now let's do it with craft beer drinkers or Harley Davidson writers.

Seth:

And the other thing I like about this is that obviously the sponsorship opportu.

Seth:

Then become really obvious.

Seth:

It is really obvious.

Seth:

Who would be interested in sponsoring your local music community?

Seth:

It's gonna be your Guitar Centers of the World, Harley Davidson Community.

Seth:

Gee, I don't know, maybe.

Seth:

Harley Davidson, all sorts of activities things.

Seth:

Good point.

Seth:

So yeah, I think that's, that's a space I would love to see radio

Seth:

explore in the coming years.

Dave:

Our thanks to Seth Resler, he is amazing.

Dave:

You'll find more about Seth and his blog and more in the show notes.

Dave:

Just scroll down on your phone.

Kipper:

As always, our thanks to exec producer Cindy Huber and to

Kipper:

Hannah B, our associate producer.

Kipper:

And coming up next,

Kipper:

It's Kramer and Jess from Mix 1 0 65 in Baltimore, and we

Kipper:

are on, on their next episode.

Kramer:

Jess has got some really encouraging words for women that are

Kramer:

getting started in this business.

Kramer:

Plus, do not take a radio job until you listen to this one piece

Kramer:

of advice that I have for you.

Kramer:

That's next time on BRANDwidth.

Dave:

That's a wrap Kipper.

Dave:

What you should do is write every day.

Dave:

Write a promo every single day.

Dave:

We'll talk about it in One Minute Martinizing.

Dave:

It's in the show notes at BRANDwidthonDemand.com.

Dave:

I'm Dave Martin.

Kipper:

And I'm Kipper McGee.

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About the Podcast

Brandwidth On Demand
The 15 Minute Podcast About Making Great Radio
Every episode, radio's top hosts, PD's and media thought leaders share tips, tools, and tradecraft secrets on remaining relevant in our ever-evolving mediascape. Hosted by veteran manager and 2nd generation broadcaster David Martin and recovering radio programmer and author of "Brandwidth, America's Digital Branding Coach " Kipper McGee.

About your host

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Kipper McGee